Read Writing, Teachers, and Students in Graeco-Roman Egypt (American Studies in Papyrology) by Raffaella Cribiore Online

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Papyri problems and exercises on papyri and ostraca, work books and text books provide some of the richest evidence for the processes of education in the Roman world This study examines how the skill of writing was taught, and how it was learned....

Title : Writing, Teachers, and Students in Graeco-Roman Egypt (American Studies in Papyrology)
Author :
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ISBN : 1597405817
Format Type : Paperback
Language : English
Publisher : ACLS Humanities E Book November 7, 2008
Number of Pages : 412 pages
File Size : 999 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Writing, Teachers, and Students in Graeco-Roman Egypt (American Studies in Papyrology) Reviews

  • H. A.
    2019-05-13 21:30

    The author is an archaeologist, but this book has value for cognitive psychologists. It provides important insights for those who want to understand how the ancient teachers figured out how to teach basic reading in transparent orthographies. Certain memory principles are implicitly illustrated, which can guide contemporary practice. The big problem of that 1996 black and white edition is that most examples are illegible. And the author refers to examples that are not shown.

  • Jordan Bell
    2019-05-27 16:18

    A previous reviewer complains about the examples not being legible. This must mean the plates, which are photographs on glossy paper at the end of the book of papyri and ostraca. In fact these are decent photographs and for many of the plates the writing is legible. When it is not legible, this is not the fault of the photograph but because the photograph is shrunk to fit the page and because the writing itself has worn off. These examples of writing have survived 2000 years and much of the craft of the papyrologist is piecing together words from only partially intact writing. Much of this book is about handwriting, and perhaps it would be useful to give magnified details from papyri rather than photographs of whole papyri.